Category Archives: Markers

Gradient Fills!

Dan has done something interesting with his exterior elevations. The elevations are too long for the layout. Typically we have a break line/match line for buildings like this. The break line on this project has one added unique feature.

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Full Elevation with Break

the elevation beyond the break line has an added fill, using a gradient fill instead of a basic white masking fill.

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Selected Gradient Fill

This gives the elevation a gradual “disappearing” at the break line.

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Enlarged Gradient Fill

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Info Box Content

The Info Box is an instrumental palette to the ARCHICAD work environment. There is content in the Info Box that is difficult, if not impossible to adjust anywhere else. A large function of this palette is to give an easy access to each element’s Selection Settings. There are, however, a few items in the Info Box that are not available in the Settings Dialogue. These are the Geometry and Construction Method settings. A handful of element types have these incorporated into the settings dialogue, such as the Geometry Method for the Shell Tool. The Shell Tool has an additional Construction Method that is only available in the Info Box.

The Info Box for all available tools with Palette only content:

The geometry method is useful for a wide range of functions. Wether it is drawing 4 walls with a simply x/y input, setting a shell to rotate a given shape rather than just a dome or arc, or setting your labels to place more precisely with a three point click instead of a simple click and drop in place; the Geometry and Construction method settings only available in the Info Box will help model more quickly and precisely.

All Things Grid Tool

First and most importantly it is essential to realize there are multiple parts to the grid tool and its interaction with the various drawings. The Grid Settings are relatively straight forward and simple to understand.

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Standard Grid Settings from Template Favorites

Above is an example of our default Grid Element Settings. If you find you do not have a Grid Element in your favorites, you can start with the line types and pen weights shown there. Also note the Naming Rules section; all grid elements have a custom name and are not generated automatically (this requires an automated grid placement that really only works for projects with very regular grids tied to beams and columns).

It is also important to note the upper right corner of the Grid Element Floor Plan Settings dialog. The drop down for Show on Story… allows you to define which stories each grid marker shows up on. I have audited projects in the past that used lines, circles, text, or even duplicate grid elements to selectively show grids on different stories. This drop down allows you to access a custom list of stories to show or hide each grid marker on. For most of our projects, this should be set to all stories for all grids, but if you need to customize this, there is an easy solution in the Grid Element Settings.

The Grid Tool Settings also have a section for Section/Elevation projections of the Grid. It is important to note that these settings DO NOT determine IF the grid will show up on Elevations or Sections, only HOW they will appear on those views.

To properly show Grids on an Elevation or Section, you need to set the Grid Settings in the views Marker Settings.

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Elevation Selection Settings for Grid Appearance

To turn on Grids for an Elevation or Section simply go to the Grid Tool section of the Markers Selection Settings and check the box to Show Grid Elements. Make sure that the elevation settings do not have Auto-stagger selected. This feature can be useful, but more times than not it just messes with the opposite views appearance.

As an example, here is a quick mock up of an elevation with a grid offset:

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Notice that Grid Element “C” is staggered over the top of Grid Element “B”. This is because the grid has been offset to the left of “B” on the opposite elevation. Staggering a grid element, either manually can cause this overlap. A manual adjustment applies the stagger to all elevation/section views that grid appears on. Automatic staggering should stagger grids appropriately for each view, but any manual changes will revert to the automatic position when the view is refreshed.

In the above example, Grid Element “C” may not need to appear on this elevation, since it is for a structural bearing line that does not relate to this side of the project. In the elevation or section marker settings, this Grid Element can easily be excluded from the Viewpoint of each marker individually. You simply need to go to the Marker Settings and click Selected under Show Grid Elements by Name and exclude the grids you do not want to show on that Viewpoint.

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Elevation Settings to Show/Exclude Individual Grid Elements

Finding Linked & Source Markers

The Quick Solution

Without getting into too much detail about the use of Source vs. Linked markers, I want to present a strategy for tracking down each marker type for given views. There are several ways to find a views source and linked markers.

First, there is a setting to show/highlight the source markers. If there is a reasonable density of source markers, it becomes easy to discern between the source and linked markers.

Highlight source markers - on screen

There is also a setting in the work environment to adjust the color of the highlight from standard yellow to any color or RGB code.On screen W-E.png

This has limited efficacy, since what you normally see is something like this:

Marker Mess

 

The Correct Solution

So a simpler, and better solution is to obtain a direct connection to the source marker and a list of the linked markers. First, click on any marker, linked or source, or open the view from the view map or project map. Once the view is open, click on it, and select the project map from the navigator. The current view will be shown in Bold in the project map list.Section Project Map

From here you can right click and select either “Select N marker on the Home Story and zoom to it”, or “Find Linked Markers”.Right Click Select Source Marker

The first option very simply zooms to the location of the source marker and selects it. The second option provides a list of all linked markers associated with that source view. If there are multiple instances or references to a single view map item in several markers, this will give a list of the marker type and location, and allow you to jump to that linked marker directly.Find linked markers 2

 

For more information on linked vs. source markers and how they work see:

Interior Elevation Naming Glitch

In ARCHICAD 19 interior elevation markers have the ability to limit the horizontal range, or be set to infinite.

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Horizontal Range Settings in the I/E Marker

Even with the Horizontal Range set to Infinite, the limited line exists, but is not active. This limited view line does however, impact the <ZoneName> auto-text naming for the I/E. It can rename the Interior Elevation to the zone its “off” extents line extends to. So if you find a stubborn interior elevation name, don’t jump to overwriting it right away. Turn on the Limited setting and review where that limiting line is set to. If you drag it back to the I/E marker boundary, then turn the Horizontal Range back to Infinite, the name should show up correctly.

Remember, there are many places and ways to override virtually everything in ARCHICAD, and most of them should just be avoided (the exceptions being anything built into the template).

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Sitting Room North Elevation Shows as Main Stair Because of Invisible Limited Range Line

A Note on Marker/View Types

All markers have three types (with the exception of Interior Elevations, which must be a Source Marker); Source, Linked and Unlinked.

Source markers generate content based on model elements. Linked markers reference an already created source content or view. Unlinked markers are a blank slate that reference not model or drafted content or existing view.

A marker may be changed from source to linked, but any source content will either be missing or translated to 2d elements. This is irreversible, and for elevations and sections, new source markers and subsequent views will need to be created. Linked or unlinked markers can not be changed to source markers. Linked markers may be changed to unlinked markers, and unlinked markers may be changed to linked markers.

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Moral of the story; do not change source markers/views to linked or unlinked markers. You can create a work sheet from any view if you need to explode view content, or place a new marker if you need the source marker to reference a different drawing.

Interior Elevation Markers

A standard interior elevation marker will look something like this:Screen Shot 2015-09-21 at 9.34.56 AM

But if you only need one or two of the elevations associated with the IE, you can delete the others. Simply select the elevation cut lines and delete them.Screen Shot 2015-09-21 at 9.34.14 AM

Which will give a warning that 2d content will not be recoverable.Screen Shot 2015-09-21 at 9.34.20 AM

But the 3d content can be recovered if necessary. Simply select the revised marker:

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Right click and select Restore All Interior Elevations in Group:

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The original (non-deleted) elevations and their 2d content will remain unchanged. The restored portions of the elevation marker will now be available and restored to the original condition. Again, just to emphasize, the 2d drafted content of the deleted markers can NOT be recovered. But there is no need to delete the entire marker and start over.