Category Archives: Navigator

Tabs in AC20

You may have noticed that tabs are a little different in AC20, as some have mentioned. The intent is that they are supposed to be a little more intuitive, and certainly are more flexible once you get the hang of them. Here are the key differences in this feature:

Eye Dropper/Inject View Settings

You can now use the same “pick-up/inject” parameters system used between all elements placed in ARCHICAD, for the view settings between tabs. Injecting the new tab with new parameters does not affect the View Settings, but only changes the viewpoint settings (like the project map navigation).

Injecting view settings into a tab will make that tap a Viewpoint, rather than a view. In order to revert back to the original view settings you need to navigate back to the View Map origin.

Double Click/Single Click Tabs

Double clicking the tab will still revert it back to its view, where single clicking will maintain any the previous Viewpoint settings. Single and double clicking tabs is one feature of the tabs that has changed most significantly. The big improvement here is that each tab, wether opened from the Project Map (Viewpoint) or View Map (View), each tab is able to retain its original view settings. This means that if you open a floor plan from the view map, then switch to a new view (3d, elevation, section), that view is not dependent on the previous tabs view settings.

This also means that navigating between tabs by shortcut does not maintain the current tab’s settings. To match a plan to 3d tab if they are not from views with matching settings, use the eye dropper/inject between tabs.

Right Clicking Tabs

In AC19, there were very limited right click options when clicking on a tab. Now, depending on the tab’s source (Project/View Map), and content, you will get a range of options. If the tab is a Viewpoint, you can actually search for saved views using that Viewpoint by right clicking on the tab. You can also open tabs with current windows settings, right click to get to Pick Up / Inject, and more.

As in AC19, you can still right click an open tab to show it as a trace reference for the currently open tab. There are several other options added to the right click drop downs, such as “Match all to Current” and “Get Last Settings”.

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One last minor feature of the tabs in 20 is the less alarming “!” symbol indicating that the View originally opened for that tab has changed and the tab is currently operating from a custom Viewpoint rather than a saved view setting.

Screen Shot 2016-08-23 at 3.00.36 PM

Folder/Subfolder Navigation

BIM6x wrote about collapsing/expanding all folders in ARCHICAD for easier navigation. I suggest you take a look at their article here.

For us, what this means is, finding that specific view map/layout book/library manager element is actually pretty easy. A fully expanded view map (see below) can be a lot to scroll through to find the folder or specific drawing/view you need.

Screen Shot 2016-04-11 at 8.59.16 AM

Hold down alt/option key and click on the folder dropdown for the elements you want to collapse. In this case it is the view map project name list.Screen Shot 2016-04-11 at 8.59.20 AM

Now when you expand the folder out again (without the alt/option key held), you get a fully collapsed view map that you can expand folder by folder to find the exact view/layout you are looking for.Screen Shot 2016-04-11 at 8.59.59 AM

This is a mac function, not specific to ARCHICAD. So it will work on any folder/subfolder navigation within ARCHICAD; such as the Project Map, View Map, Layout Book, Publisher, Place Drawing dialogue, or the Library Manager. It also works in the finder in list view.

Finding Linked & Source Markers

The Quick Solution

Without getting into too much detail about the use of Source vs. Linked markers, I want to present a strategy for tracking down each marker type for given views. There are several ways to find a views source and linked markers.

First, there is a setting to show/highlight the source markers. If there is a reasonable density of source markers, it becomes easy to discern between the source and linked markers.

Highlight source markers - on screen

There is also a setting in the work environment to adjust the color of the highlight from standard yellow to any color or RGB code.On screen W-E.png

This has limited efficacy, since what you normally see is something like this:

Marker Mess

 

The Correct Solution

So a simpler, and better solution is to obtain a direct connection to the source marker and a list of the linked markers. First, click on any marker, linked or source, or open the view from the view map or project map. Once the view is open, click on it, and select the project map from the navigator. The current view will be shown in Bold in the project map list.Section Project Map

From here you can right click and select either “Select N marker on the Home Story and zoom to it”, or “Find Linked Markers”.Right Click Select Source Marker

The first option very simply zooms to the location of the source marker and selects it. The second option provides a list of all linked markers associated with that source view. If there are multiple instances or references to a single view map item in several markers, this will give a list of the marker type and location, and allow you to jump to that linked marker directly.Find linked markers 2

 

For more information on linked vs. source markers and how they work see:

Interior Elevation Naming Glitch

In ARCHICAD 19 interior elevation markers have the ability to limit the horizontal range, or be set to infinite.

Screen Shot 2016-01-19 at 2.34.11 PM

Horizontal Range Settings in the I/E Marker

Even with the Horizontal Range set to Infinite, the limited line exists, but is not active. This limited view line does however, impact the <ZoneName> auto-text naming for the I/E. It can rename the Interior Elevation to the zone its “off” extents line extends to. So if you find a stubborn interior elevation name, don’t jump to overwriting it right away. Turn on the Limited setting and review where that limiting line is set to. If you drag it back to the I/E marker boundary, then turn the Horizontal Range back to Infinite, the name should show up correctly.

Remember, there are many places and ways to override virtually everything in ARCHICAD, and most of them should just be avoided (the exceptions being anything built into the template).

Screen Shot 2016-01-19 at 2.34.22 PM

Sitting Room North Elevation Shows as Main Stair Because of Invisible Limited Range Line

A Note on Marker/View Types

All markers have three types (with the exception of Interior Elevations, which must be a Source Marker); Source, Linked and Unlinked.

Source markers generate content based on model elements. Linked markers reference an already created source content or view. Unlinked markers are a blank slate that reference not model or drafted content or existing view.

A marker may be changed from source to linked, but any source content will either be missing or translated to 2d elements. This is irreversible, and for elevations and sections, new source markers and subsequent views will need to be created. Linked or unlinked markers can not be changed to source markers. Linked markers may be changed to unlinked markers, and unlinked markers may be changed to linked markers.

Screen Shot 2015-11-18 at 11.06.02 AM

Moral of the story; do not change source markers/views to linked or unlinked markers. You can create a work sheet from any view if you need to explode view content, or place a new marker if you need the source marker to reference a different drawing.

Drawing ID Sequence

When laying out drawings, you may notice elevations, sections and interior elevations may not automatically order based on their arrangement on the page.

Some drawings have very consistent drawing borders or “sizes”, such as details. These are numbered by their location on the drawing grid. All other drawing types are numbered based on the order they appear in layout book under their layout.

Screen Shot 2015-11-18 at 9.50.57 AM

In the above example, only one of these drawings should have a title block, and thus should be 1/AA2.1 FOUNDATION. This drawing shows up last in the list however, and will be numbered “5” by default. The first fix for this is to drag the drawing to the top of the list under its layout.

A more permanent fix is to change all other drawings to be be excluded from the ID sequence. This can be done by selecting the drawings on the layout and unchecking the box in the info box palette:

Screen Shot 2015-11-18 at 9.38.00 AM

Or by selecting the drawings in the layout book and opening their settings:

Screen Shot 2015-11-18 at 9.37.36 AM

Now regardless of the order of the drawings in the layout book, the notes and legends drawing’s will not factor into the layout numbering.

Another Linked Marker/Navigator Graphic

This is a little redundant from my last post, but think it bears repeating (and this graphic is pretty cool!). Linked markers should be linked to the view map, not the layout book in order to maximize future flexibility of the layout book organization.

The image below should be a little more clear than my previous post. In the diagram below; source markers (1. Project Map) create views (2. View Window) such as the FP Section Detail or the Building Section. Linked markers can be a variation or additional content on a source marker or can be created from and independent or unlinked view, such as the roof details. All these are then saved as unique views (3. View Map), and linked to their markers before being placed to a layout (4. Layout Book). Linked markers should not be placed with reference to layout book drawings.Linked Marker Work FlowAs stated in the last post, this should be the practice, but if your project is already in the CD phase and has linked markers associated directly to layout drawings, do not attempt to redo the view map or layout book. Just be very diligent about reviewing all linked markers whenever a drawing is relocated, removed or moved to a new sheet.