Tag Archives: Error Messages

Delete Local Data

It is critical to keep your local data clean and current. The first step in doing this is to periodically leave the projects you are working in. This forces your local data to rebuild from the server data on the next open/join. This has all been outlined in our BIM manual under the Collaboration section. It is also outlined in part here and here. For more information on ARCHICAD errors and possible solutions, check out this article.

So lets assume you have a local data error that will not allow you to send or receive. The solution is:

  1. Save a .pln to your desk top, so that you do not lose any of your work
  2. Leave the teamwork project and completely close ARCHICAD
  3. Open ARCHICAD and “Browse for Teamwork File” and immediately click “Cancel”
  4. Go to the Teamwork menu > Project > Local Data Manager
  5. Delete ALL content from the list (libraries and project files). This will need to be done line by line.

screen-shot-2017-01-06-at-11-39-46-am

As a bonus tip, you can set your work environment to schedule the local data clean up reminders under Local Data Manager > Options. This should be set to send a reminder every 30 days minimum, for projects older than 30 days. Always delete local data when prompted! Unless you are opening from a crash recovery, there is no need to ignore local data clean up warnings.

In 2017, we need to make it a goal to Send and Receive often (every hour at least); lets pay attention to the Teamwork protocols in our BIM manual and avoid lost work!

Error Reports

This is something that we all deal with, and I think most of us ignore. THE ERROR REPORT!!!!! It can seem daunting to try to understand why this comes up or what it means. I did write an article on this before, but I’d like to boil this down to the root cause & solution in a little more detail here. The error report can come up for a variety of reasons. Here are a few:

  • Missing attribute (typically fills) of an object
  • Missing macro part of an object (less common with our latest library version)
  • Invalid or inverted geometry, typically a slab or roof but often caused by the Cadimage Coverings

So why do we need to pay attention? Because these corrupt or un-processable elements can cause major file slow down or crashes! More than that, its annoying to have these messages come up every time the 3d window is refreshed.

And now the solution, how do we fix a file with an error report? It is usually very simple. If the error report comes up in the 3D window, open the 3D window, review the Report window, and scroll to the bottom. The report is a list of everything that has been (or is not able to) be processed in a given view. It will typically show problematic elements last, so they will be at the end of the list.Screen Shot 2015-09-17 at 11.43.38 AM

In the image above, I loaded a handful of objects with known problems and placed them in the model to force the report. The first outlined section shows the object names that can not be fully processed. The next section shows the library part with Element ID CAB-15 CAB-13. If the element causing problems is not a library part, the report will not give the first outlines section, but will report the element ID of problematic elements.

To fix this file  you only need to do a find and select for the element or objects name or element ID. If the error states that the object “Can’t find Macro:” the solution is to replace it with a good object. If it states that a polygon is degenerated the slab or roof just needs to be inspected for bad or odd geometries (look for groups of nodes that shouldn’t be there). If the report states that a fill is missing, do a find & select for the element ID or Name and replace the missing attribute. After this you should be able to refresh the view without the error report resulting.

ANOTHER REASON TO USE UNIQUE ELEMENT ID’S

Element ID’s And Weeding Out Problem Objects

Occasionally you may come across objects with degenerated scripts, bad geometry or missing attributes. These can cause error reports to generate.  While most of these error reports may seem like line after line of gibberish, some key lines can give clues as to the source of the problem.  If the problem stems from an object the object name may appear.  Regardless of the element type, the Element ID will always show up in a line.  If you have 2,000 objects all labeled “Z M067” in the element ID field it may be a little tricky finding the one or two that are messing things up.
Shower Head1If you are lucky enough to track down a line of the report that gives you the elements actual name or type you can search for those objects using the find and select feature.  In this case it was a shower head object and was easily discernible in the error report via the object name.

Shower Head3It is almost always a good idea, however to add a unique Element ID to your objects, walls, floors, roofs, columns and beams that references the objects function, type, size or location.  This element ID can be used for or associated with labeling elements, scheduling or searching.

Shower Head2