Tag Archives: Interior Elevations

All Things Grid Tool

First and most importantly it is essential to realize there are multiple parts to the grid tool and its interaction with the various drawings. The Grid Settings are relatively straight forward and simple to understand.

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Standard Grid Settings from Template Favorites

Above is an example of our default Grid Element Settings. If you find you do not have a Grid Element in your favorites, you can start with the line types and pen weights shown there. Also note the Naming Rules section; all grid elements have a custom name and are not generated automatically (this requires an automated grid placement that really only works for projects with very regular grids tied to beams and columns).

It is also important to note the upper right corner of the Grid Element Floor Plan Settings dialog. The drop down for Show on Story… allows you to define which stories each grid marker shows up on. I have audited projects in the past that used lines, circles, text, or even duplicate grid elements to selectively show grids on different stories. This drop down allows you to access a custom list of stories to show or hide each grid marker on. For most of our projects, this should be set to all stories for all grids, but if you need to customize this, there is an easy solution in the Grid Element Settings.

The Grid Tool Settings also have a section for Section/Elevation projections of the Grid. It is important to note that these settings DO NOT determine IF the grid will show up on Elevations or Sections, only HOW they will appear on those views.

To properly show Grids on an Elevation or Section, you need to set the Grid Settings in the views Marker Settings.

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Elevation Selection Settings for Grid Appearance

To turn on Grids for an Elevation or Section simply go to the Grid Tool section of the Markers Selection Settings and check the box to Show Grid Elements. Make sure that the elevation settings do not have Auto-stagger selected. This feature can be useful, but more times than not it just messes with the opposite views appearance.

As an example, here is a quick mock up of an elevation with a grid offset:

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Notice that Grid Element “C” is staggered over the top of Grid Element “B”. This is because the grid has been offset to the left of “B” on the opposite elevation. Staggering a grid element, either manually can cause this overlap. A manual adjustment applies the stagger to all elevation/section views that grid appears on. Automatic staggering should stagger grids appropriately for each view, but any manual changes will revert to the automatic position when the view is refreshed.

In the above example, Grid Element “C” may not need to appear on this elevation, since it is for a structural bearing line that does not relate to this side of the project. In the elevation or section marker settings, this Grid Element can easily be excluded from the Viewpoint of each marker individually. You simply need to go to the Marker Settings and click Selected under Show Grid Elements by Name and exclude the grids you do not want to show on that Viewpoint.

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Elevation Settings to Show/Exclude Individual Grid Elements

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Integrate a Trim Reveal Into Doors/Windows

On occasion you may want to pull the interior finish of a wall away from the trim/frame to show a reveal. In the past we have done this with a beam/column/morph SEO around each opening. Now, thanks to a strange glitch in a project, we can replicate a reveal integrated into the Cadimage door and window settings.

First, in the window/door settings, open up the “All Parameters…” drop down from the top of the Cadimage Window – Settings portion of the selection settings.Screen Shot 2016-04-13 at 10.52.18 AM

Next scroll down until you see a drop down for Composite Skins. You can adjust the offset from outside of frame (Wall Hole size), to the position of the composite skins finish.Screen Shot 2016-04-13 at 10.52.36 AM

Once the trim position and frame dimensions are correct, the result for this example is a trim that is flush with the interior face of wall finish, but with a 1/2″ reveal to the trim width.Screen Shot 2016-04-13 at 10.50.47 AM

A couple of things worth noting on this setting:

  • This is a uniform reveal for all sides/top/bottom of the window or door’s relationship to the wall that it is hosted in
  • This is not measured from the trim position, but from the wall hole, or outside edge of the main frame

Interior Elevation Naming Glitch

In ARCHICAD 19 interior elevation markers have the ability to limit the horizontal range, or be set to infinite.

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Horizontal Range Settings in the I/E Marker

Even with the Horizontal Range set to Infinite, the limited line exists, but is not active. This limited view line does however, impact the <ZoneName> auto-text naming for the I/E. It can rename the Interior Elevation to the zone its “off” extents line extends to. So if you find a stubborn interior elevation name, don’t jump to overwriting it right away. Turn on the Limited setting and review where that limiting line is set to. If you drag it back to the I/E marker boundary, then turn the Horizontal Range back to Infinite, the name should show up correctly.

Remember, there are many places and ways to override virtually everything in ARCHICAD, and most of them should just be avoided (the exceptions being anything built into the template).

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Sitting Room North Elevation Shows as Main Stair Because of Invisible Limited Range Line

Interior Elevation Markers

A standard interior elevation marker will look something like this:Screen Shot 2015-09-21 at 9.34.56 AM

But if you only need one or two of the elevations associated with the IE, you can delete the others. Simply select the elevation cut lines and delete them.Screen Shot 2015-09-21 at 9.34.14 AM

Which will give a warning that 2d content will not be recoverable.Screen Shot 2015-09-21 at 9.34.20 AM

But the 3d content can be recovered if necessary. Simply select the revised marker:

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Right click and select Restore All Interior Elevations in Group:

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The original (non-deleted) elevations and their 2d content will remain unchanged. The restored portions of the elevation marker will now be available and restored to the original condition. Again, just to emphasize, the 2d drafted content of the deleted markers can NOT be recovered. But there is no need to delete the entire marker and start over.

Interior Elevation Cut Pen

There is a lot of content regarding best interior elevation marker settings, wether to mask or not mask the cut etc. (Shoegnome, GS Help Center). For WWA staff, the latest AC18 Master Favorites includes an interior elevation marker with all the correct settings (just updated today in the template & available for all AC18 projects), and our BIM manual includes an extensive article on how to document interior elevations.

Late last week a model manager discovered another little piece of important information on how to place interior elevation markers. More specifically, why the marker extents should be to the face of stud minimum, and never to the face of finish.

First, the following images show a plan view of the marker extents to face of finish and the resulting interior elevation (ignore the lack of ceiling for now). Notice the cut line at the walls is not correctly matched to the cut line at the floor.

Screen Shot 2015-06-10 at 11.48.43 AM Screen Shot 2015-06-10 at 11.49.09 AMThe correct marker location/extents should be to the face of stud to avoid cropping the line weight by the marker extents, like the following images.

Screen Shot 2015-06-10 at 11.49.33 AM Screen Shot 2015-06-10 at 11.49.47 AMAlso worth noting, the marker range should extend from top of subfloor or the thickness of the finish floor for the vertical range base to the bottom of framing at the rooms highest point (ridge, top of plate, etc.) to avoid cropping line weights at the ceiling or floor.