Tag Archives: View Settings

3d Style

In ARCHICAD 21, we were introduced to 3d Styles; a new view setting which allows customization of the view style in ARCHICAD. With the introduction of ARCHICAD 22, there are some new 3d Style effects that customize the smoothness and efficiency of 3d navigation and views. These are settings that existing in 21, but we are starting to see an effect of model appearance in 22.

This is especially prominent in high polygon models.

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model while viewing 3d

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model while navigating (explore) 3d

In the examples above, the same model has content “disappear” when using the explore feature of a high polygon model. This is presumably a feature of AC22 to improve navigation and 3d performance.

To prevent content from vanishing, the advanced settings in the 3d styles options need to be tuned. Click the Gear icon in the 3d styles setting next to the 3d Engine fly-out.  In the Advanced > OpenGL Options, cut the frame rate to the lowest setting (1), and the display radius to the highest setting (328′-1 1/64″, for whatever reason).

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Advanced Open GL Options for ideal 3d viewing in AC22

These settings are not new to 22; in fact they are the same defaults out of the box as AC21. But the defaults need to be adjusted to work well with the changes or improvements made to AC22’s 3d processing.

 

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Door and Window Markers

When working through process, it is important to not use the “no marker” setting in the doors and windows; unless a door or window will never have a marker attached to it; for framed openings, shutters, shower doors, etc.

Door and window markers are library parts, that have default settings. So when a marker is set to “no marker” to hide, then turned back to W Marker 21/22 or D Marker 21/22, the settings go back to their default. These defaults do not match our graphic standards for pens, font, marker type, or any other setting. Markers switched off at the element level, then turned back on need to be meticulously realigned with the projects graphics and our office graphic standards.

The proper way to hide door and window markers throughout the entire plan is through model view options. Either a temporary “custom” MVO can be used to turn markers off, or a dedicated MVO (such as our template 00 | Presentation Plan) can be applied.

 

The Wrong Way!

  1. Place Doors & Windows from Favorites:

01 - Doors From Favs

2. Door/Window Marker Settings from Favorites (correctly showing D Marker 21)

02 - Default Marker Settings

3. Set Marker to No Marker… Nope! Don’t do it!

03 - No Markers

4. When Marker is reset to D Marker 21(22), it comes back looking like this; and it takes a lot of time to rebuild to the correct settings defined by the favorites.

04 - Marker Switched Back On

5. Turn markers off using the Model View Options instead!

05 - Model View Options

Note: in ARCHICAD 22, there are no “Custom” MVO’s. If Markers are turned off for the 02 | Construction Documents they will be off for all views using that setting. But unlike turning markers off at the element level, turning them off & on in the MVO will retain the default settings for the marker from the favorites.

Doors & Walls – Symbolic or Projected

The symbolic or projected view of a door determines wether it matches the exact 3d settings of the door or is just a graphic plan symbol. There may be cases for both, but it is important to know what the settings do; and find the right combination of settings for both the wall and the door so that they both appear as expected, or in some combinations, appear at all.

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Wall Projection Settings

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Door Projection Settings

Below is the break down of what each combination of wall and door settings with 3 different relationships to plan cut plane settings.

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Walls and Doors Projection Settings

Graphic Overrides!

Almost all projects have been migrated to AC20 now, and we have just run into the first “special case” for the new Graphic Override feature. Since we use 3d Documents for Reflected Ceiling Plans, we don’t have the advantage of full control over the door or window graphics or even appearance; they show as their literal cut regardless of door settings or Model View Options. In this case, we simply wanted to hide a couple of doors in the RCP; the folding doors on the right side of the image below:

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To do this, we just took the Graphic Override for RCP’s and added a new Graphic Override Rule (Hide Doors):

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This rule simply has a criteria that requires the override to apply to Doors 224 & 235 in this project. Then the Override Style is set to override all Lines to Pen 91, Fills to Empty Fill with Pen 91 for Foreground Pen 0 for Background.screen-shot-2016-09-15-at-2-11-22-pm

The result is exactly what we wanted to see; doors are there, but not visible in the documents:

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It is important to note that this solution does not resolve the Pen and Fill issues we see with saving DWG files; and further exploration is needed to find a solution for exporting DWG files without these doors showing up on our consultants plans.

All Things Grid Tool

First and most importantly it is essential to realize there are multiple parts to the grid tool and its interaction with the various drawings. The Grid Settings are relatively straight forward and simple to understand.

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Standard Grid Settings from Template Favorites

Above is an example of our default Grid Element Settings. If you find you do not have a Grid Element in your favorites, you can start with the line types and pen weights shown there. Also note the Naming Rules section; all grid elements have a custom name and are not generated automatically (this requires an automated grid placement that really only works for projects with very regular grids tied to beams and columns).

It is also important to note the upper right corner of the Grid Element Floor Plan Settings dialog. The drop down for Show on Story… allows you to define which stories each grid marker shows up on. I have audited projects in the past that used lines, circles, text, or even duplicate grid elements to selectively show grids on different stories. This drop down allows you to access a custom list of stories to show or hide each grid marker on. For most of our projects, this should be set to all stories for all grids, but if you need to customize this, there is an easy solution in the Grid Element Settings.

The Grid Tool Settings also have a section for Section/Elevation projections of the Grid. It is important to note that these settings DO NOT determine IF the grid will show up on Elevations or Sections, only HOW they will appear on those views.

To properly show Grids on an Elevation or Section, you need to set the Grid Settings in the views Marker Settings.

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Elevation Selection Settings for Grid Appearance

To turn on Grids for an Elevation or Section simply go to the Grid Tool section of the Markers Selection Settings and check the box to Show Grid Elements. Make sure that the elevation settings do not have Auto-stagger selected. This feature can be useful, but more times than not it just messes with the opposite views appearance.

As an example, here is a quick mock up of an elevation with a grid offset:

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Notice that Grid Element “C” is staggered over the top of Grid Element “B”. This is because the grid has been offset to the left of “B” on the opposite elevation. Staggering a grid element, either manually can cause this overlap. A manual adjustment applies the stagger to all elevation/section views that grid appears on. Automatic staggering should stagger grids appropriately for each view, but any manual changes will revert to the automatic position when the view is refreshed.

In the above example, Grid Element “C” may not need to appear on this elevation, since it is for a structural bearing line that does not relate to this side of the project. In the elevation or section marker settings, this Grid Element can easily be excluded from the Viewpoint of each marker individually. You simply need to go to the Marker Settings and click Selected under Show Grid Elements by Name and exclude the grids you do not want to show on that Viewpoint.

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Elevation Settings to Show/Exclude Individual Grid Elements

Relevant Stories

Everyone should be familiar with the Floor Plan Display settings for the various element types in ARCHICAD. Some tools are very flexible in regards to which stories they are visible on, others seem very limited; namely the wall and column tool. With these tools, you only get two options; Home Story Only and All Relevant Stories. So what constitutes a Relevant Story?

For this example, I have just thrown together a couple walls in the ARCHICAD20 Residential Template, but it illustrates the point well enough.Screen Shot 2016-07-26 at 4.46.32 PM

The boundary walls are 12′ tall and extend 2′ to the the story above. The bisecting wall is 10 feet tall and is top linked to stop at exactly the story above. All walls are set to show on All Relevant Stories.

The resulting floor plans are as follows (Home Story left, Above Home Story right):

If this is not showing how you need or expect it to you can adjust the view settings to determine the constraints for a Relevant Story in the view map view settings.

Going to the Roof Story’s view settings, go to the 2D/3D Documents section and click on Floor Plan Cut Plane Settings…

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From here, you can define what extents will be considered relevant for this view. If I want the boundary walls to show as cut instead of outline as illustrated in the plan views above, I can drop the Cut Plan height to Current Story to a level that will cut the outer walls. Then if I want to include the interior wall as an outline element (not cut through), I can set the Relative Floor Plan Range: Show down to: Current Story -2′ (or any height that would include this wall.

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The result is that the home story for these walls has not changed, all walls are shown as cut just as before, but the story above shows with the taller walls cut and the lower wall as outline only:

One of the amazing advantages of this feature is that a wall may be Relevant for one view, but not for another. Even though the story settings match, the wall height never changes, but the wall appears on one plan view, but not another of the same story. Or it appears as cut in one plan view but as outlines only for another view of the same story.

The default for our floor plans is to have the Cut Plan height to Current Story set to 4′, and all offsets set to 0″, but there are always cases to fine tune this to show or hide elements, or change how certain elements may show in a given view.

 

3D View to 3D Document

The view map should include a source view associated with each 3d document. This is true for reflected ceiling plans, detail axons, whole building foundation diagrams or any other view where view and content will need to be maintained and updated. In this post I will explore creating a foundation axon document that can quickly be updated to add new foundation elements, both 3d & 2d, without losing previously documented content, alignment or view settings.

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The 3d view that a 3d document is created from should come from a camera or saved 3d window in the view map for consistent view angle creation. It should be saved to the view map with predefined view settings; if a layer combination doesn’t exist for the content you want to see, create one. The view settings should not be set to “custom” for any of the view map settings.

navigator- view map

Additional view content restrictions may be applied, but difficult to replicate if the model or content change. Things like marquee restrictions, cutting planes or filter and cut elements in 3d can be difficult (but not impossible) to replicate when the 3d document needs to be rebuilt from a source view. To ensure these settings can be duplicated with updates to 3d model/document content, these settings need to be documented, such as hotspots and marque or cutting plane locations or screen shots.

filter-cut in 3d

One tool that can be invaluable (and is widely underused) for 3d document rebuilding is the selections palette. Once you have the content isolated in the 3d window, select it and save it to the selections palette with a name that relates to, or matches, the view map name for the 3d window or 3d document.

Selections

Using this palette you can open the camera view, re-select the original elements, add any new elements to the selection and isolate in the 3d window. The selection palette should be updated for future use with this new selection.

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Now just redefine the 3d document (in the project map > 3d document settings) with current window settings and your document will match the original camera angle, cone, and drafted content alignment; but will include the new model elements.

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